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Wed, Apr 05

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Online (Google Meet)

A Catholic Perspective on Pharmaceutical Development for Global Health

A short historical survey of the motivation, development and scope of Catholic health care. Catholic social teaching such as solidarity, the universal destination of goods, and the preferential option for the poor. The connection between monasticism and development of medicines.

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A Catholic Perspective on Pharmaceutical Development for Global Health
A Catholic Perspective on Pharmaceutical Development for Global Health

Time & Location

Apr 05, 2023, 4:00 p.m. PDT

Online (Google Meet)

About the event

Note the talk is 5 PM Edmonton time, so 4 PM Vancouver time.

The option to participate virtually via Google Meet is available. To get the virtual link, please contact: Matt Oryschak Communications Coordinator Society of Catholic Scientists (Edmonton Chapter) e: oryschak@ualberta.ca

Abstract

This presentation will begin with a short historical survey of the motivation, development and scope of Catholic health care. It will discuss the emergence of pharmaceutical sciences as an independent discipline and the strengths and weaknesses of the for-profit model of medical product development. Metrics to assess global disease burden reveal an unmet need in the areas of infections and diseases that disproportionately affect populations in resource-poor countries. Catholic pharmaceutical scientists may be able to address this need by considering concepts of Catholic social teaching such as solidarity, the universal destination of goods, and the preferential option for the poor. That technical solutions can be motivated accordingly will be shown with examples from dosage form design of vaccines and respiratory therapeutics. Finally, the option of reviving the connection between monasticism and development of medicines will be introduced for discussion.

About the presenter

Dr. Reinhard Vehring is a professor in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Alberta. He has held positions in academia and the pharmaceutical industry for more than 30 years. He worked on inhalable insulin at Nektar Therapeutics and subsequently supported FluMist, the first nasally administered influenza vaccine. He is the lead inventor for a formulation technology which has been commercialized by AstraZeneca with three approved products indicated against asthma and COPD.

Currently, Dr. Vehring’s research group collaborates with a non-profit organization, the Access to Advanced Health Institute, in the development of thermostable vaccines for use in low and middle-income countries.

Dr. Vehring is the president of the Edmonton Chapter of the Society of Catholic Scientists.

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